Deputy Sheriff Morris (Gunny) Froscher

Talk to me about “Good Cop-Bad Cop?”

A saint, that needs a visit from the Pope.

Gunny retired from the Marines in 2000, and should be retiring from the Volusia County Sheriff’s Department.

However, he said that he has no plans to retire while he can still be doing good for his jurisdiction.

Volusia County deputy goes out of his way to help local homeless

Feb 05, 2016

Friday is his day off, but a Volusia County sheriff’s deputy was up early and in uniform, making the rounds on his unusual beat.

Deputy Morris Froscher regularly visits homeless camps in his jurisdiction and several times a year he brings food and clothes, all on his dime.

About a dozen homeless camps are on the west side of Volusia County and around the outskirts of Deland with about 45-50 people living in them.

Froscher, a former Marine, frequently checks on the people in the camps, often, bearing gifts of food, clothing and personal hygiene products.

Steven Patterson and his wife have lived in the camp for 2 years and they welcome the deputy like an old friend.

“It’s somebody that I can trust. It’s somebody that I know is on our side. He’s not pushing to get rid of us out of here,”

Patterson said.

http://www.wesh.com/news/volusia-county-deputy-goes-out-of-his-way-to-help-local-homeless/37843526

Deputy Sheriff Morris (Gunny) Froscher has a ‘quiet’ list of “Do Goods” the length of your arm!

Patrol Deputy Volusia Deputy Sheriff’s Office Marines U.S. Marine Corps

12 Total References

That was so nice of you,” young Vinny Landolfi wrote Volusia County sheriff’s deputy Morris Froscher.

“The child was very upset so I just wanted to do something that would make him feel better,” Froscher said in a recent interview. “I did it on my day off because I didn’t want anybody to know about it but the little boy wrote my boss a letter.”

Not only did Sheriff Ben Johnson find out that Froscher replaced Vinny’s piggy bank, but he reviewed Froscher’s file and discovered it was full of numerous commendations from citizens Froscher had helped while off duty.

Among the many things the deputy is praised for are cases where he mentored an out-of-control child, placed a confused 88-year-old man into a hotel room and called his family instead of charging him for not having a driver’s license, changed tires for others and gave sympathy cards to widowers.

Johnson wrote a letter to the Division of Victim Services and Criminal Justice Programs at the state Attorney General’s Office recommending Froscher for the Florida Attorney General’s 2014 Distinguished Award. Froscher got the Victim Services Award in April.

“He is the most compassionate cop I have ever met,” Johnson said. “Here is a deputy who comes to work every day and makes a difference in people’s lives and even does it when he is not working because he wants to make sure they get the best treatment.”

Nicholas Landolfi, Vinny’s father, says the actions of Froscher – a patrol deputy in unincorporated areas near DeLand – make him worthy.

The day after the burglary, Landolfi got a call from Froscher asking him to meet the deputy at the Big Rig 2 Restaurant where Landolfi works.

Froscher also gave Vinny an envelope containing $20 and told Vinny it’s to start his piggy bank fund.

Froscher said it was nice that he got the award but noted does not help people to get special recognition.

The 14-year veteran deputy grew up “very poor” in Virginia and left his town to escape farmland and coal mine labor. He joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1980, where his most memorable achievement was becoming a marathon runner.

He ran the Boston Marathon in 2 hours 40 minutes. He retired from the Marines in 2000 and has been with the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office since then.

“The hardest part of my job is seeing how victims of crime are affected,” Froscher said.

VOLUSIA DEPUTY EARNS FLORIDA VICTIM SERVICE AWARD.

Morris Froscher, a patrol deputy with the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office who routinely goes above and beyond the normal call of duty to assist and support victims, was honored Wednesday in Tallahassee with a victim services award. Froscher was among six recipients of the annual Distinguished Victim Services Awards that were presented by Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi during a ceremony marking victims’ rights week

Volusia County Sheriff Ben Johnson nominated Froscher for the award and was on-hand for Wednesday’s ceremony.

A 13-year veteran of the Sheriff’s Office, Froscher has provided unwavering support to victims through many personal acts of compassion and kindness — both on-duty and off. These acts include making follow-up visits to crime victims, writing personalized sympathy cards to people who have lost loved ones and stopping while off-duty to provide roadside assistance to stranded motorists. In yet another example, when an 8-year-old crime victim had his game system stolen and piggy bank damaged by thieves, Froscher went beyond his normal duties by bringing the boy a new piggy bank with a $20 bill stuffed inside it. These were among the many acts cited in Sheriff Johnson’s nomination letter. Froscher’s assigned patrol zone is in unincorporated DeLand.

“For Deputy Froscher, each call for service and every citizen contact is an opportunity to help someone in need, project a positive image and serve as a goodwill ambassador…..,” wrote Sheriff Johnson.

COUNTY GOVERNMENT NAMES EMPLOYEES OF THE YEAR

Morris Froscher, deputy, Sheriff’s Office.

That was so nice of you,”

That was so nice of you,” young Vinny Landolfi wrote Volusia County sheriff’s deputy Morris Froscher

“The child was very upset so I just wanted to do something that would make him feel better,” Froscher said in a recent interview. “I did it on my day off because I didn’t want anybody to know about it but the little boy wrote my boss a letter.”

Not only did Sheriff Ben Johnson find out that Froscher replaced Vinny’s piggy bank, but he reviewed Froscher’s file and discovered it was full of numerous commendations from citizens Froscher had helped while off duty.

Among the many things the deputy is praised for are cases where he mentored an out-of-control child, placed a confused 88-year-old man into a hotel room and called his family instead of charging him for not having a driver’s license, changed tires for others and gave sympathy cards to widowers.

Johnson wrote a letter to the Division of Victim Services and Criminal Justice Programs at the state Attorney General’s Office recommending Froscher for the Florida Attorney General’s 2014 Distinguished Award. Froscher got the Victim Services Award in April.

“He is the most compassionate cop I have ever met,” Johnson said. “Here is a deputy who comes to work every day and makes a difference in people’s lives and even does it when he is not working because he wants to make sure they get the best treatment.”

Nicholas Landolfi, Vinny’s father, says the actions of Froscher – a patrol deputy in unincorporated areas near DeLand – make him worthy.

The day after the burglary, Landolfi got a call from Froscher asking him to meet the deputy at the Big Rig 2 Restaurant where Landolfi works.

Froscher also gave Vinny an envelope containing $20 and told Vinny it’s to start his piggy bank fund.

Froscher said it was nice that he got the award but noted does not help people to get special recognition.

The 14-year veteran deputy grew up “very poor” in Virginia and left his town to escape farmland and coal mine labor. He joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1980, where his most memorable achievement was becoming a marathon runner.

He ran the Boston Marathon in 2 hours 40 minutes. He retired from the Marines in 2000 and has been with the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office since then.

“The hardest part of my job is seeing how victims of crime are affected,” Froscher said.

“I did it on my day off because I didn’t want anybody to know about it but the little boy wrote my boss a letter.”Not only did Sheriff Ben Johnson find out that Froscher replaced Vinny’s piggy bank, but he reviewed Froscher’s file and discovered it was full of numerous commendations from citizens Froscher had helped while off duty. Among the many things the deputy is praised for are cases where he mentored an out-of-control child, placed a confused 88-year-old man into a hotel room and called his family instead of charging him for not having a driver’s license, changed tires for others and gave sympathy cards to widowers.Johnson wrote a letter to the Division of Victim Services and Criminal Justice Programs at the state Attorney General’s Office recommending Froscher for the Florida Attorney General’s 2014 Distinguished Award. Froscher got the Victim Services Award in April.”He is the most compassionate cop I have ever met,” Johnson said. “Here is a deputy who comes to work every day and makes a difference in people’s lives and even does it when he is not working because he wants to make sure they get the best treatment.”Nicholas Landolfi, Vinny’s father, says the actions of Froscher – a patrol deputy in unincorporated areas near DeLand – make him worthy.Landolfi said he was amazed at how Froscher handled the crime scene and took time to calm his upset son before leaving. The day after the burglary, Landolfi got a call from Froscher asking him to meet the deputy at the Big Rig 2 Restaurant where Landolfi works.”I thought he wanted more information about the case or that he had something to tell me about it,” Landolfi said. But what Froscher did at the restaurant got Landolfi emotional.”The first thing he told me was, “did you know how hard it is to find a piggy bank these days around town?’ ” Landolfi said.

“He then took us to his a patrol car and gave my son a piggy bank shaped like a football.”Froscher also gave Vinny an envelope containing $20 and told Vinny it’s to start his piggy bank fund.”I choked up about it,” Landolfi said.

It’s the value of the deed.”Froscher said it was nice that he got the award but noted does not help people to get special recognition. The 14-year veteran deputy grew up “very poor” in Virginia and left his town to escape farmland and coal mine labor. He joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1980, where his most memorable achievement was becoming a marathon runner. He ran the Boston Marathon in 2 hours 40 minutes. He retired from the Marines in 2000 and has been with the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office since then.”The hardest part of my job is seeing how victims of crime are affected,” Froscher said.

Deputy Morris Froscher

Volusia County – Morris Froscher, a patrol deputy with the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office, was honored this past April in Tallahassee with a National Sheriff’s Association Crime Victim Services Award for routinely going above and beyond the normal call of duty to assist and support victims.

Volusia County Sheriff Ben Johnson nominated Froscher for the award after it was brought to his attention that multiple victims had written letters praising Froscher.

A 13-year veteran of the Sheriff’s Office, Froscher has provided unwavering support to victims through many personal acts of compassion and kindness – both on and off duty.

These acts include making follow-up visits to crime victims, writing personalized sympathy cards to people who have lost loved ones, and stopping while off duty to provide roadside assistance to stranded motorists.

Following a burglary, in which the thief broke and robbed an eight-year-old boy’s piggy bank and stole his Wii video game system, Froscher replaced the boy’s piggy bank and gave him $20.00 in start-up money. Froscher did it on his day off so no one could make a big deal about it.

A few days later, while off duty, Froscher showed up at the business and replaced them – even digging the holes.

Sheriff Johnson wrote, “Froscher is a model law enforcement officer and a tireless advocate for victims who lives, breathes and embodies the term ‘serve and protect’ in every way possible.

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